Library & Information Technology and the Provost’s Office is sponsoring a Faculty Scholarship Reception on Monday, April 13, 2015, 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m., in the Bertrand Library’s Traditional Reading Room. This reception recognizes Bucknell faculty members who have published journal articles, exhibits, performances, films, and other works in 2014-2015.

Use tags on the righthand side of the page to see works represented by specific departments.

February 24th, 2015

Erin’s Hope, Irish Blood and Indefeasible Allegiance: Reconfiguring Citizenship and Nationalism in an Era of Increased Mobility – Adrian Mulligan

In the wake of the 1867 Rising—a failed attempt to establish an Irish Republic by force—a ship named the Erin’s Hope delivered to Ireland a number of Irish-American officers whose objective was to continue the fight. They were arrested immediately, and despite their protestations, charged as British subjects with treason-felony against the Queen. This paper illuminates their plight, the manner in which they attempted to reframe their predicament, and how the UK and the US responded legislatively to such troublesome mobility during a period when Ireland was governed in a draconian fashion and Irish nationalism was stronger amongst the Diaspora […]

Continue reading Erin’s Hope, Irish Blood and Indefeasible Allegiance: Reconfiguring Citizenship and Nationalism in an Era of Increased Mobility – Adrian Mulligan »

February 24th, 2015

Kyrgyzstan’s Dark Ages: Framing and the 2010 Hydroelectric Revolution – Amanda Wooden

Prior to the 2010 overthrow of Kyrgyzstan’s government, there were tangible signs of popular dissatisfaction with the ruling Bakiev regime. Beginning in spring 2008, electricity shortages and forced restrictions became a daily reminder of the government’s ineptitude, corruption and regional vulnerability. This article reports the results of a survey and interviews conducted in 2009–10. The results reveal how popular perceptions of energy and water supply shaped the average Kyrgyzstani’s frustration with the ruling regime in the year before the revolution. The paper explores how the Bakiev administration attempted to frame the electricity crisis in nationalistic and naturalized ways, and how […]

Continue reading Kyrgyzstan’s Dark Ages: Framing and the 2010 Hydroelectric Revolution – Amanda Wooden »

February 24th, 2015

Two-Band Fast Hartley Transform – Maurice F. Aburdene

Efficient algorithms have been developed over the past 30 years for computing the forward and inverse discrete Hartley transforms (DHTs). These are similar to the fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithms for computing the discrete Fourier transform (DFT). Most of these methods seek to minimise the complexity of computations and/or the number of operations. A new approach for the computation of the radix-2 fast Hartley transform (FHT) is presented. The proposed algorithm, based on a two-band decomposition of the input data, possesses a very regular structure, avoids the input or out data shuffling, requires slightly less multiplications than the existing approaches, […]

Continue reading Two-Band Fast Hartley Transform – Maurice F. Aburdene »

February 24th, 2015

Application of Discrete Fourier Inter-Coefficient Difference for Assessing Genetic Sequence Similarity – Brian R. King

Digital signal processing (DSP) techniques for biological sequence analysis continue to grow in popularity due to the inherent digital nature of these sequences. DSP methods have demonstrated early success for detection of coding regions in a gene. Recently, these methods are being used to establish DNA gene similarity. We present the inter-coefficient difference (ICD) transformation, a novel extension of the discrete Fourier transformation, which can be applied to any DNA sequence. The ICD method is a mathematical, alignment-free DNA comparison method that generates a genetic signature for any DNA sequence that is used to generate relative measures of similarity among […]

Continue reading Application of Discrete Fourier Inter-Coefficient Difference for Assessing Genetic Sequence Similarity – Brian R. King »

February 23rd, 2015

Chris Martine – Plants are Cool, Too! Desert Blooms and Marathon Moths

Giant hawk moths fly for miles each night in search of flower nectar — and are thus critically important as pollinators of desert wildflowers. Dr. Chris Martine joins Krissa Skogen (Chicago Botanic Garden) in New Mexico’s White Sands National Monument and finds plant romance happening by the light of the full moon.  

Continue reading Chris Martine – Plants are Cool, Too! Desert Blooms and Marathon Moths »

February 23rd, 2015

Chris Martine – Plants are Cool, Too! New Species in the Desert

What do you get when a team of biologists from Mexico and the US sets out to explore remote areas of the Chihuahuan Desert? Lots of examples of the evolution of new species — and plenty of evidence that the world is still full of things to discover. Dr. Mike Moore of Oberlin College and his collaborators are featured in Episode 5 of “Plants are Cool, Too!”  

Continue reading Chris Martine – Plants are Cool, Too! New Species in the Desert »

February 23rd, 2015

Déja Vù – Deirdre O’Connor

So I will have written it before, I write my mother died. It isn’t true. She lives in Pittsburgh, has a dresser, bed and chair in her room, a wardrobe and TV. Her name is Sharpied in all her collars and on the inner soles of her shoes, one of which was discovered beneath her neighbor Mildred’s pillow, where she may have laid it down to sleep. Blue leather shoe she wore to work with corduroy slacks and cotton shirts, islanded shoe, exhausted shoe laid to rest then made to do its job upon a foot again. Dear clairvoyant shoe, […]

Continue reading Déja Vù – Deirdre O’Connor »

February 23rd, 2015

Transnational Marriage: Modern Imaginings, Relational Realignments, and Persistent Inequalities – Coralynn V. Davis

In the context of shifting cultural anchors as well as unstable global economic conditions, new practices of intimacy and sexuality may become tactics in an individual’s negotiation of conflicting desires and potentials. This article offers reflection on the interface between global forces, powerful transcultural narratives, and state policies, on the one hand, and local, even individual, constructions and tactics in regard to sexuality, marriage, migration, and work, on the other. The article focuses on the life trajectory of Gudiya, an ambitious young Hindu woman who started out life with little social capital and few economic resources in a dusty corner […]

Continue reading Transnational Marriage: Modern Imaginings, Relational Realignments, and Persistent Inequalities – Coralynn V. Davis »

February 23rd, 2015

Strategic Deployments of ‘Sisterhood’ and Questions of Solidarity at a Women’s Development Project in Janakpur, Nepal – Coralynn V. Davis

Linguistic uses of ‘sisterhood’ provide a window into disparate understandings of relationality among virtual and actual interlocutors in women’s development across vectors of caste, class, ethnicity and nationality. In this essay, I examine the trope of ‘sisterhood’ as it was employed at a women’s development project in Janakpur, Nepal, in the 1990s. I demonstrate that the use of this common signifier of kinship with culturally disparate ‘signifieds’ created a confusion of meaning, and differential readings of the politics of relationality. In my view, ‘sister,’ as used at this project, was a multivalent, strategically deployed, and divergently interpreted term. In particular, […]

Continue reading Strategic Deployments of ‘Sisterhood’ and Questions of Solidarity at a Women’s Development Project in Janakpur, Nepal – Coralynn V. Davis »

February 23rd, 2015

More Skin, More Sun, More Tan, More Melanoma – Paula Davis

Although personal melanoma risk factors are well established, the contribution of socioeconomic factors, including clothing styles, social norms, medical paradigms, perceptions of tanned skin, economic trends, and travel patterns, to melanoma incidence has not been fully explored. We analyzed artwork, advertisements, fashion trends, and data regarding leisure-time activities to estimate historical changes in UV skin exposure. We used data from national cancer registries to compare melanoma incidence rates with estimated skin exposure and found that they rose in parallel. Although firm conclusions about melanoma causation cannot be made in an analysis such as this, we provide a cross-disciplinary, historical framework […]

Continue reading More Skin, More Sun, More Tan, More Melanoma – Paula Davis »

Close

Places I've Been

The following links are virtual breadcrumbs marking the 12 most recent pages you have visited in Bucknell.edu. If you want to remember a specific page forever click the pin in the top right corner and we will be sure not to replace it. Close this message.