Friday, February 26th, 2016

James E. Maneval – Maeng, Daniel D.; Snyder, Ryan; Medico, Charles J.; Mold, Winona M.; and Maneval, James E. “Unused Medications and Disposal Patterns at Home: Findings from a Medicare Patient Survey and Claims Data.” Journal of the American Pharmacists Association 56, (2016) : 41-46.

James E. Maneval, Professor of Chemical Engineering

Objective: To examine what medications are most frequently left unused by patients, how much is left unused, and how these medications are disposed of among Medicare beneficiaries. Design: Secondary data analysis combining insurance claims and telephone survey data of Medicare Advantage members. Setting: Regional health plan in Central Pennsylvania. Participants: Seven hundred twenty-one Medicare Advantage members who had Part D coverage through the plan as of December 31, 2013, and completed the telephone survey in May 2014. Intervention: Telephone survey conducted by a survey research center. Main outcome measure: Member survey response. Results: Of the 2,994 medications in the dataset, 247 (8%) were reported being left unused by patients. Of the 247, the most common medications were those for pain (15%), hypertension (14%), antibiotics (11%), and psychiatric disorders (9%). Approximately 15% of unused medications were controlled substances. The reasons for being unused varied by drug type. For example, for pain medications, adverse effects and overprescribing were the most commonly cited reasons; for hypertension medications, “dosage changed by doctor” was the most common reason. Most commonly, unused portions accounted for approximately 25% to 50% of the unused medications identified by patients. Approximately 11% of unused medication was disposed of via drug take-back programs, whereas the majority was kept in a cabinet (55%), thrown in the trash (14%), or flushed down the toilet (9%). Conclusion: A lack of patient adherence alone does not explain unused medications and their improper disposal. Community-level interventions designed to improve prescription efficiency and patient awareness of appropriate disposal methodsdparticularly of controlled substancesdare necessary to reduce the potentially harmful effects of improper disposal of unused medications.

Maeng, Daniel D.; Snyder, Ryan; Medico, Charles J.; Mold, Winona M.; and Maneval, James E. “Unused Medications and Disposal Patterns at Home: Findings from a Medicare Patient Survey and Claims Data.” Journal of the American Pharmacists Association 56, (2016) : 41-46.

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Friday, February 26th, 2016

Michael D. Gross – Siegel, Nathan P.; Gross, Michael D.; and Coury, Robert. “The Development of Direct Absorption and Storage Media for Falling Particle Solar Central Receivers.” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering 137, no. 4 (2015) : 041003.

Michael D. Gross, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering

Spherical sintered bauxite particles between 200 mu m and 700 mu m in diameter have been shown to be effective in the direct absorption and storage of concentrated solar energy. These particles are commercially available in large quantities and exhibit as-received solar weighted absorptance (alpha(s)) greater than 0.90, which gradually degrades with extended heating in air at 700 degrees C and above. The degradation mechanism is an oxidation reaction that can be reversed via thermal or chemical reduction, resulting in alpha(s) > 0.95 along with enhanced resistance to further degradation for some formulations. Certain metal oxide pigments, added to Al2O3:SiO2, have proven to achieve solar weighted absorptance levels similar to those of the commercially available particles and may be promising alternatives to currently available materials.

Siegel, Nathan P.; Gross, Michael D.; and Coury, Robert. “The Development of Direct Absorption and Storage Media for Falling Particle Solar Central Receivers.” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering 137, no. 4 (2015) : 041003.

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Friday, February 26th, 2016

Kat Wakabayashi – Miu, Evan V.; Fox, Andrew J.; Jubb, Samuel H.; and Wakabayashi, Kat. “Morphology and Toughness Enhancements in Recycled High-Density Polyethylene (rHDPE) via Solid-State Shear Pulverization (SSSP) and Solid-State/Melt Extrusion (SSME).” Journal of Applied Polymer Science133, no. 10 (2016) : 43070.

Kat Wakabayashi, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering

Solid-state, mechanochemical polymer processing techniques are explored as an effective and sustainable solution to appearance and performance issues commonly associated with recycled plastic products. Post-consumer high-density polyethylene (HDPE) from milk jugs is processed via conventional twin screw extrusion (TSE), solid-state shear pulverization (SSSP), and solid-state/melt extrusion (SSME), and compared to the as-received and virgin forms regarding output attributes and mechanical properties, as well as morphology. Solid-state processing methods, particularly SSME with a harsh screw configuration, produce samples with consistent appearance and melt flow characteristics. Tensile ductility/toughness and impact toughness are enhanced by up to 11-fold as compared to the as-received sample, to a level near and above those of an equivalent virgin HDPE. Calorimetry, optical microscopy, X-ray scattering, and rheology characterization reveal that the mechanical improvements result from a favorable combination of physical and molecular changes in rHDPE, such as impurity size reduction, spherulite size enlargement, and chain branching. (C) 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Miu, Evan V.; Fox, Andrew J.; Jubb, Samuel H.; and Wakabayashi, Kat. “Morphology and Toughness Enhancements in Recycled High-Density Polyethylene (rHDPE) via Solid-State Shear Pulverization (SSSP) and Solid-State/Melt Extrusion (SSME).” Journal of Applied Polymer Science133, no. 10 (2016) : 43070.

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Friday, February 26th, 2016

Kat Wakabayashi – Wakabayashi, Kat. “Active, Collaborative Learning via Real-World Projects with Local Industrial Clients: Materials Selection and Product Design in an Upper-Level Undergraduate Elective.”Journal of Materials Education 37, no. 5-6 (2015) : 185-196.

Kat Wakabayashi, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering

Materials selection and product design principles are effectively introduced in an upper-level undergraduate materials elective course by way of client projects. The projects involve local industry and entrepreneurs with real product development needs, and are implemented with short, focused scope and timeframe to supplement the traditional components and activities of an advanced materials science and engineering course. Feedback from students indicate successful transfer of their fundamental materials knowledge to authentic engineering problems, and course assessment shows evidence of the positive effect and value of multi-faceted learning gained from the client project.

Wakabayashi, Kat. “Active, Collaborative Learning via Real-World Projects with Local Industrial Clients: Materials Selection and Product Design in an Upper-Level Undergraduate Elective.”Journal of Materials Education 37, no. 5-6 (2015) : 185-196.

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Friday, February 26th, 2016

Ryan Snyder – Maeng, Daniel D.; Snyder, Ryan; Medico, Charles J.; Mold, Winona M.; and Maneval, James E. “Unused Medications and Disposal Patterns at Home: Findings from a Medicare Patient Survey and Claims Data.” Journal of the American Pharmacists Association 56, (2016) : 41-46.

Ryan Snyder, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

Objective: To examine what medications are most frequently left unused by patients, how much is left unused, and how these medications are disposed of among Medicare beneficiaries. Design: Secondary data analysis combining insurance claims and telephone survey data of Medicare Advantage members. Setting: Regional health plan in Central Pennsylvania. Participants: Seven hundred twenty-one Medicare Advantage members who had Part D coverage through the plan as of December 31, 2013, and completed the telephone survey in May 2014. Intervention: Telephone survey conducted by a survey research center. Main outcome measure: Member survey response. Results: Of the 2,994 medications in the dataset, 247 (8%) were reported being left unused by patients. Of the 247, the most common medications were those for pain (15%), hypertension (14%), antibiotics (11%), and psychiatric disorders (9%). Approximately 15% of unused medications were controlled substances. The reasons for being unused varied by drug type. For example, for pain medications, adverse effects and overprescribing were the most commonly cited reasons; for hypertension medications, “dosage changed by doctor” was the most common reason. Most commonly, unused portions accounted for approximately 25% to 50% of the unused medications identified by patients. Approximately 11% of unused medication was disposed of via drug take-back programs, whereas the majority was kept in a cabinet (55%), thrown in the trash (14%), or flushed down the toilet (9%). Conclusion: A lack of patient adherence alone does not explain unused medications and their improper disposal. Community-level interventions designed to improve prescription efficiency and patient awareness of appropriate disposal methodsdparticularly of controlled substancesdare necessary to reduce the potentially harmful effects of improper disposal of unused medications.

Maeng, Daniel D.; Snyder, Ryan; Medico, Charles J.; Mold, Winona M.; and Maneval, James E. “Unused Medications and Disposal Patterns at Home: Findings from a Medicare Patient Survey and Claims Data.” Journal of the American Pharmacists Association 56, (2016) : 41-46.

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Friday, February 26th, 2016

Michael J. Prince – Shekhar, Prateek; Demonbrun, Matt; Borrego, Maura; Finelli, Cynthia; Prince, Michael J.; Henderson, Charles; and Waters, Cynthia. “Development of an Observation Protocol to Study Undergraduate Engineering Student Resistance to Active Learning.” International Journal of Engineering Education 31, no. 2 (2015) : 597-609.

Michael J. Prince, Professor of Chemical Engineering

Student resistance is often cited as a major barrier to instructors’ use of active learning, but there are few research-based strategies for reducing this barrier. In this paper, we describe the first phase of our research-the development and validation of a classroom observation protocol to assess student responses to instructors’ use of active learning. This protocol, which draws upon other published observation protocols, allows researchers to capture data about instructors’ use of and students’ responses to active learning. We also present findings from four first and second year engineering courses at two institutions that demonstrate the variety of ways engineering students resist active learning and strategies that engineering instructors have employed to reduce student resistance.

Shekhar, Prateek; Demonbrun, Matt; Borrego, Maura; Finelli, Cynthia; Prince, Michael J.; Henderson, Charles; and Waters, Cynthia. “Development of an Observation Protocol to Study Undergraduate Engineering Student Resistance to Active Learning.” International Journal of Engineering Education 31, no. 2 (2015) : 597-609.

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