Friday, February 26th, 2016

Neil Boyd – Boyd, Neil. “Introducing Thriving at Work to the Field of Community Psychology.” Journal of Community Psychology 43, no. 6 (2015) : 794-809.

Neil Boyd, Associate Professor of Management

Advances in the organizational behavior and management literatures toward social sustainability are leading to new theories, models, and concepts that promote employee well-being and functioning while helping organizations achieved desired ends. One concept that has yet to be imported to community psychology is thriving at work, which is the joint experience of learning and vitality, where a worker is able to grow, develop, and feel energized (Spreitzer et al., 2005). This paper will articulate a definition of thriving at work, explore current theory and modeling of the concept, and show why it is a unique concept of importance to community psychologists. Then, thriving at work will be integrated into recent scholarship on sense of community and sense of community responsibility in organizational settings (Boyd & Nowell, 2014; Nowell & Boyd, 2010; 2011), with an eye on showing how thriving at work can help community psychologists advance organizational behavior research in our field. Finally, in the epilogue of the paper, some thoughts will be advanced on how thriving at work can be incorporated with important research topics in the field of community psychology, and how it can potentially be translated to community contexts in general. (C) 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Boyd, Neil. “Introducing Thriving at Work to the Field of Community Psychology.” Journal of Community Psychology 43, no. 6 (2015) : 794-809.

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Friday, February 26th, 2016

Neil Boyd – Green, Brandn; Jones, Kristal; Boyd, Neil; Milofsky, Carl; and Martin, Eric C. “Students Implement the Affordable Care Act: A Model for Undergraduate Teaching and Research in Community Health and Sociology.” Journal of Community Health 40, no. 3 (2015) : 605-611.

Neil Boyd, Associate Professor of Management

The implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides an opportunity for undergraduate students to observe and experience first-hand changing social policies and their impacts for individuals and communities. This article overviews an action research and teaching project developed at an undergraduate liberal arts university and focused on providing ACA enrollment assistance as a way to support student engagement with community health. The project was oriented around education, enrollment and evaluation activities in the community, and students and faculty together reflected on and analyzed the experiences that came from the research and outreach project. Student learning centered around applying concepts of diversity and political agency to health policy and community health systems. Students reported and faculty observed an unexpected empowerment for students who were able to use their university-learned critical thinking skills to explain complex systems to a wide range of audiences. In addition, because the project was centered at a university with no health professions programs, the project provided students interested in community and public health with the opportunity to reflect on how health and access to health care is conditioned by social context. The structure and pedagogical approaches and implications of the action research and teaching project is presented here as a case study for how to engage undergraduates in questions of community and public health through the lens of health policy and community engagement.

Green, Brandn; Jones, Kristal; Boyd, Neil; Milofsky, Carl; and Martin, Eric C. “Students Implement the Affordable Care Act: A Model for Undergraduate Teaching and Research in Community Health and Sociology.” Journal of Community Health 40, no. 3 (2015) : 605-611.

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Friday, February 26th, 2016

William R. Gruver – Traflet, Jan and Gruver, William R. “The Quixotic Quest for Fairness: The SEC’s Role in the Rise of High Frequency Trading.” Essays in Economic and Business History 33, no. 1 (2015) : 144-189.

William R. Gruver, Professor of Management Practice

This paper examines the complex factors facilitating the rise of high frequency trading (HFT) from a historical perspective. Over the course of several decades, various stock market regulations and reforms, championed by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), created room for HFT to develop and flourish. While advancements in technology initially may appear to be the primary cause of HFT, in fact, HFT could not exist (or at least, not to the extent it does today) if certain rules and older ways of doing business on the exchanges were still in place, and if other regulations did not support its existence. This paper identifies multiple factors contributing to the eventual rise of HFT: decimalization, the decline of the specialist system, market fragmentation, rate deregulation, the repeal of the uptick rule, demutualization of the stock exchanges, and the institution of Regulation National Market System [NMS]. Moreover, it seeks to position these developments within the broader context of long-standing aims and themes embraced by the SEC.

Traflet, Jan and Gruver, William R. “The Quixotic Quest for Fairness: The SEC’s Role in the Rise of High Frequency Trading.” Essays in Economic and Business History 33, no. 1 (2015) : 144-189.

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Friday, February 26th, 2016

Eric C. Martin – Martin, Eric C.; Nolte, Isabella; and Vitola, Emma. “Communication, Cooperation, Coordination, Collaboration – The 4Cs: Interorganizational Partnering in Haiti.” Disasters (2015).

Eric C. Martin, Associate Professor of Management

Coordinating organizational activity across different sectors is crucial in disaster management. We analysed the response of 291 aid workers to the Haiti earthquake in 2010 and found that common incentives and a high degree of equality among aid organizations positively affected perceived network coordination. Large and public organizations were more likely to take leadership roles and high numbers of public organizations involved in the disaster response network led to improved network coordination. These results indicate the need for mechanisms that enable smaller and non-profit organizations to participate in network coordination and leadership.

Martin, Eric C.; Nolte, Isabella; and Vitola, Emma. “Communication, Cooperation, Coordination, Collaboration – The 4Cs: Interorganizational Partnering in Haiti.” Disasters (2015).

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Friday, February 26th, 2016

Eric C. Martin – Green, Brandn; Jones, Kristal; Boyd, Neil; Milofsky, Carl; and Martin, Eric C. “Students Implement the Affordable Care Act: A Model for Undergraduate Teaching and Research in Community Health and Sociology.” Journal of Community Health 40, no. 3 (2015) : 605-611.

Eric C. Martin, Associate Professor of Management

The implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides an opportunity for undergraduate students to observe and experience first-hand changing social policies and their impacts for individuals and communities. This article overviews an action research and teaching project developed at an undergraduate liberal arts university and focused on providing ACA enrollment assistance as a way to support student engagement with community health. The project was oriented around education, enrollment and evaluation activities in the community, and students and faculty together reflected on and analyzed the experiences that came from the research and outreach project. Student learning centered around applying concepts of diversity and political agency to health policy and community health systems. Students reported and faculty observed an unexpected empowerment for students who were able to use their university-learned critical thinking skills to explain complex systems to a wide range of audiences. In addition, because the project was centered at a university with no health professions programs, the project provided students interested in community and public health with the opportunity to reflect on how health and access to health care is conditioned by social context. The structure and pedagogical approaches and implications of the action research and teaching project is presented here as a case study for how to engage undergraduates in questions of community and public health through the lens of health policy and community engagement.

Green, Brandn; Jones, Kristal; Boyd, Neil; Milofsky, Carl; and Martin, Eric C. “Students Implement the Affordable Care Act: A Model for Undergraduate Teaching and Research in Community Health and Sociology.” Journal of Community Health 40, no. 3 (2015) : 605-611.

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Friday, February 26th, 2016

Elton G. McGoun – Bialaszek, Wojciech; Gaik, Maciej; McGoun, Elton G.; and Zielonka, Piotr. “Impulsive People Have a Compulsion for Immediate Gratification – Certain or Uncertain.” Frontiers in Psychology 6, (2015) : 515.

Elton G. McGoun, Professor of Management

Impulsivity has been defined as choosing the smaller more immediate reward over a larger more delayed reward. The purpose of this research was to gain a deeper understanding of the mental processes involved in the decision making. We examined participants’ rates of delay discounting and probability discounting to determine their correlation with time-probability trade-offs. To establish the time-probability trade-off rate, participants adjusted a risky, immediate payoff to a delayed, certain payoff. In effect, this yielded a probability equivalent of waiting time. We found a strong, positive correlation between delay discount rates and the time-probability trade-offs. This means that impulsive people have a compulsion for immediate gratification, independent of whether the immediate reward is certain or uncertain. Thus, they seem not to be concerned with risk but rather with time.

Bialaszek, Wojciech; Gaik, Maciej; McGoun, Elton G.; and Zielonka, Piotr. “Impulsive People Have a Compulsion for Immediate Gratification – Certain or Uncertain.” Frontiers in Psychology 6, (2015) : 515.

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Friday, February 26th, 2016

Jan Traflet – Traflet, Jan and Gruver, William R. “The Quixotic Quest for Fairness: The SEC’s Role in the Rise of High Frequency Trading.” Essays in Economic and Business History 33, no. 1 (2015) : 144-189.

Jan Traflet, Associate Professor of Management

This paper examines the complex factors facilitating the rise of high frequency trading (HFT) from a historical perspective. Over the course of several decades, various stock market regulations and reforms, championed by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), created room for HFT to develop and flourish. While advancements in technology initially may appear to be the primary cause of HFT, in fact, HFT could not exist (or at least, not to the extent it does today) if certain rules and older ways of doing business on the exchanges were still in place, and if other regulations did not support its existence. This paper identifies multiple factors contributing to the eventual rise of HFT: decimalization, the decline of the specialist system, market fragmentation, rate deregulation, the repeal of the uptick rule, demutualization of the stock exchanges, and the institution of Regulation National Market System [NMS]. Moreover, it seeks to position these developments within the broader context of long-standing aims and themes embraced by the SEC.

Traflet, Jan and Gruver, William R. “The Quixotic Quest for Fairness: The SEC’s Role in the Rise of High Frequency Trading.” Essays in Economic and Business History 33, no. 1 (2015) : 144-189.

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